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Autism and Holiday Schedules

by marketing@aapcpublishing.net on Sunday, December 21, 2014 8:00 PM

Written by Judy Endow, MSW

For an autistic, getting through the holiday time can be tricky. For me, as an autistic parent with children who had different needs, it was even trickier. But routine and structure can go a long way toward making things easier! They anchor days, which can otherwise be perceived by an autism neurology as totally chaotic and, in turn, lead to being overwhelmed and experiencing meltdowns.

1.  Start by creating a visual schedule. You can simply use paper and pencil or use an iPad or computer to make your visual schedule. Words can be visuals for readers...READ MORE.

The Outlook
Autism
Parents
Tips
Holidays
Routine
Structure
Schedule

CHRISTMAS DAY – A HOLIDAY!?

by marketing@aapcpublishing.net on Sunday, December 14, 2014 5:00 AM
Written by Josie Santomauro 

Christmas Day was always a day of mixed highs and lows for my son. The highs of receiving gifts and riding on the heightened excitement even if he didn't know what was going on, and the lows of forced socializing and close body contact via hugging and kissing from family members, all leading to a major sensory overload that would occur approximately around 4 pm. 

This was usually our cue to exit and head home as everyone looked at us sympathetically, exclaiming, “He’s tired, poor thing.” No and yes! He’s tired, overloaded, and overwhelmed and has autism – add that all together and you have an exploding volcano. Where the lava ends up you’ll never know unless you remove him from the situation that is causing the eruption...READ MORE.

 


The Outlook
Autism
Autistic "Behavior"
Games
Parents
Parent Support
Tips
Holidays
Family

Good Neighbors: Teach Your Child to be a Part of the Community

by marketing@aapcpublishing.net on Monday, October 13, 2014 7:18 AM

Written by Elizabeth A. Sautter, MA, CCC-SLP, AAPC Author

Wherever you live, neighbors are important. These are the people you’ll see day after day, and the people you’ll likely turn to when you need a cup of milk or your car won’t start. Developing friendly relationships with neighbors and teaching your children to do the same will build community on your block and help your child develop a sense of responsibility for others. Here are some ideas for teaching your child to be a thoughtful and helpful neighbor:

1. Be a Role Model: When you stop to greet a neighbor and take the time to ask how they've been, your child will learn to do the same. Likewise, when you offer to feed a neighbor’s cat or pick up their mail, your child will follow your lead. When a new neighbor moves in, bring the...READ MORE. 

The “Frenemy”

by marketing@aapcpublishing.net on Wednesday, October 1, 2014 8:47 AM

Written by Susan Diamond, MA, CCC, Speech-Language Pathologist and AAPC Author

Many parents feel at a loss when their school-aged child tells them that they are having friend trouble at school. If a child shares that he is being teased, the parent may not know what to do, especially if the teaser is a friend of their child. Most parents feel worried for their child and want everything to be okay. They want the teasers to stop, and they want school life to be socially fun.

As a result, many parents try to solve the social problem for their child. Most children know that this does not work. When their parents contact the friend’s parents and discuss the issues, the peer says the teasing will stop; however, it does not stop. Sometimes it makes the child more alienated. I am not speaking of bullying here! If a child feels threatened they need to get help. I am speaking of friendship manipulation on the playground, which may be referred to as a “frenemy.” READ MORE.

The Outlook
Parents
Social Rules
Susan Diamond
Social Learning
Tips

Conditions of the Mind are Still in the Mind

by marketing@aapcpublishing.net on Monday, September 22, 2014 7:00 AM

Written by Catherine Bristow, AAPC author

It’s been six years since My Strange and Terrible Malady, my novel of a teen girl’s struggle with her Asperger’s diagnosis, was published.  I am heartened every quarter to see that people are still buying (and, I hope, reading and enjoying) the book. AAPC does a great job of disseminating information for and about people living with conditions and abilities as yet imperfectly understood by society. Advocacy for the change of societal attitudes is a noble pursuit. It is also a long-term one. Unfortunately, we all still see or experience the effects of indifference, ignorance, or (even worse) good intentions misapplied. 

What to do?... READ MORE

 

Change Happens

by marketing@aapcpublishing.net on Monday, September 15, 2014 4:20 AM

Written by Lesley Ernst, singer/songwriter

A special education teacher from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, told me a story about how after her students came back to school from spring break, they were out of sorts. They did not adapt well to change. To help and support her students, she asked if I could compose a song about change. I obliged, and came up with the song "Change Happens." I used to work with students who had severe disabilities, including autism spectrum disorders. One of my students would get so worked up over anticipated changes, especially holiday breaks, that he would dig...READ MORE.

The Outlook
Autism
Anxiety
Lesley Ernst
Music
Change
Holidays

Flexible Thinking: Make Social Learning Stick and Help Your Child Adapt and Compromise

by marketing@aapcpublishing.net on Wednesday, September 3, 2014 9:00 AM

Written by Elizabeth Sautter, AAPC Author and Mom's Choice Award Winner

Being a flexible thinker is part of emotional regulation and is essential to social success. Flexibility of thought means being able to adapt to new situations, understand and accept another person’s perspective, and “go with the flow” as unexpected challenges or obstacles arise. Here are some tips from my book Make Social Learning Stick! to help children learn and practice the art of flexible thinking. 

1.      Plan of the Day: Discuss or write out a list of events...READ MORE 

Rumor Has It

by marketing@aapcpublishing.net on Friday, August 29, 2014 1:00 AM

Written by Susan Diamond, MA, CCC, Speech-Language Pathologist and AAPC Author

Has your child ever been confused about whether something she heard is true? Does your child pass along unconfirmed information? Has your child ever become stuck on a half-truth because it is so interesting and juicy? What does your child do when he hears a rumor? When children tend to interpret the world around them literally, they may not know whether something is true or untrue. They may assume that if another kid says something, it is correct. 

The Outlook
Parents
Educators
Rumors
Social Rules
Susan Diamond

Introducing Letter Treasure Hunt

by marketing@aapcpublishing.net on Saturday, August 23, 2014 2:00 PM

Written by Jenny Clark Brack, ORT/L, AAPC Author

Attention parents, educators and therapists! Letter Treasure Hunt (Therapro, inc. 2014) combines exercise and handwriting practice in a motivating and fun game to get kids moving and to develop important handwriting skills. It can be used in home settings, school environments, occupational therapy sessions, etc. From its humble origins as an idea to encourage handwriting activities for my son, this handwriting game was played on an existing game board covered with white contact paper, then adding stickers to decorate with my son’s favorite sports mascot. READ MORE

 

The Outlook
Asperger
Autism
Games
Parents
Educators
Therapists
Jenny Clark Brack

Addressing the Anxiety-Autism Connection

by marketing@aapcpublishing.net on Tuesday, August 19, 2014 7:00 PM

Written by Christopher Lynch, PhD, AAPC Author

Anxiety and autism often seem to go hand in hand.  As a psychologist working with children on the autism spectrum, I observed this connection early on.  However, it took some time for me to realize just how much anxiety can impact a child’s daily life. It was during my time running a social skills group for young teens on the spectrum that the connection became clear.  The group had been going OK – the kids were trying their best to learn the concepts and participate in the role-plays.  However, it all felt a bit stilted.  I didn’t sense that the members were connecting on any kind of emotional level. READ MORE

The Outlook
Asperger
Autism
Anxiety
Christopher Lynch

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